Christchurch Bus Tour

{Originally posted by Marin Jacobson, a sophomore Equine Science major, is spending the Spring of 2015 in Lincoln, New Zealand. Her blog is located directly here}

So yesterday (Sunday 02/22) I got to go on a bus tour of Christchurch (which the locals just write as ChCh). This was a free event through LU, so that was great. I went with my friend Amanda (also from CSU), and Rebecca (Kiwi). We first went through the actual city of ChCh, stopping at the ChCh Botanical Gardens, which I’ll post pictures of below. It was the 4 year anniversary of the earthquake, so people were honoring those affected by floating these beautiful flowers down a river/creek.

After the gardens we went more into the city area, stopping to see the new cathedral (the old one was famously affected by the earthquake) pictured below. Unfortunately we couldn’t go inside due to a concert, but they had some lovely stained glass windows.

From here we went to the pier in ChCh and ate lunch there. I wasn’t too hungry so I got apple pear juice and a caramel bar I couldn’t even finish half of (SO RICH).
It was a very grey skies kind of day, but the ocean was a really strange green color! My ocean back home is super dark blue so that’s kind of cool, even though they’re technically the same ocean 😉 Well after ChCh we went to some AMAZING surrounding towns, including Lyttleton and Sumner. We stopped on the side of the road for pictures, but didn’t stop for touristy things otherwise we were going to miss dinner.
That was pretty much it! Not incredibly in depth, but it was so nice to be able to see some of our surrounding area! I really want to go back to Lyttleton and Sumner, both were very scenic and cute towns. I hate big cities, so these were more my pace 🙂 Oh and here’s a nice sunset view from our kitchen window!

Still LOVING it here! Everyone is incredibly kind and friendly. New post to come soon on classes: week one!

The Finest Walk in the World

Brian Merewitz is a senior Natural Resources Management major and is currently studying abroad in New Zealand.

[Originally posted September 18, 2013. To see more from Brian, check out her blog directly here.]

McKinnon Pass

McKinnon Pass

So, exams are done (finally!), and now it was time to travel. After a rough goodbye with some good friends, my mate from Colorado State who is in New Zealand (Lisa) and I headed off to the bus to Te Anau for the Milford Track, dubbed the “finest walk in the world.”

The bus left Sunday afternoon, but we wouldn’t start tramping until Monday morning. However, our bus broke down, but after a short delay, we were on the road and made it to Te Anau. Lisa has used couchsurfing many times before, which is a social network for travelers, where you can meet people to travel with, host them in your place, or found hosts to stay with, all for free. I had never used it, but she organised it to stay with a guy in Te Anau and it was an amazing experience! He was 53, semi-retired, and full of information. He has hosted over 50 people and has heaps of fascinating stories, pictures, and gifts (including a rock from Antarctica), but he even met us at the bus stop, walked us to the DOC office, and really made us feel at home. There was also a German kid, 20 I believe, there who was really friendly. Des, the host, knew the area like the back of his hand and was Maori, so he told us a lot about their culture. Anyway, we spent Sunday night at his house, then were to catch a bus to Te Anau Downs, where we would catch a ferry to the track–it’s quite the trek before you even begin!

Now, Des warned us that a few days ago he had two Aussies stay at his house and they were required to pay a helicopter deposit because avalanche danger was high, but we didn’t have to pay when we got there! The track is fully booked (40 people/day) from now until March 27th and on the ferry, we already made some friends–a Dutch kid travelling around the world called Robin and a German named Christian. So, once we finally got to the trail head, Lisa and I, along with our new mates headed off! Unfortunately, they regulate the track heavily during peak season, so you’re required to stay at the first hut, which is a mere 1 hour walk from the trail head. Once we got there, though, we went down by the river and were going to swim, until we got our toes wet and decided laying on rocks in the sun sounded more fun. I was a little uneasy about sharing a hut with 40 people–so far, I’d had nearly every hut to myself, but as the time went on, I really grew to like it. Part of what made the trip fun was the social aspect. That night at the hut, we met an Aussie (Otto), who was there with his dad as a college graduation gift and a group of 3 Australian couples in their 50s, who were super friendly! Throughout our 3 nights together, we got to know nearly everyone, but Otto, Robin, Christian, and the Aussies were the best! There were people from all over the world–America (us, a couple from Cleveland, and a couple from San Diego), France, Aussie, NZ, Germany, South Korea, and Holland. Back to the day though, once the sand flies (NZ’s mosquito) got bad, we retreated from the river back to the hut to eat dinner and socialize.

Me on McKinnon Pass

Me on McKinnon Pass

The second day was slightly harder, but still not too bad. The hut warden told us that if the weather is nice when we get to the hut, we should continue up to the pass–the highest part of the track because it’d be a pity if we didn’t go then the weather was bad on day three. This day’s walk was fairly easy through the bush with a few very scenic openings, and then a bit of an incline towards the end. When we woke up, there was a great deal of cloud cover, but by midday, the sun broke through. So now, we’ve had two days of sunshine in a row. This area is notorious for its rain–the ranger told us 28 rainy days/month isn’t unrealistic! So, we arrived at the second hut around 3pm and, since we’re in summer and at low latitude we have long days (light until 9:30pm), so we took a short break. Afterwards, the sun was still shining strong, so Lisa, Otto, Robin, Christian, and myself walked up the pass, which was about an hour from the hut (without packs it felt great!). The views were unreal. Even after 5 months here, I was speechless. We were surrounded by peaks in every direction and most of them have waterfalls running off of them, not to mention two of them had avalanches coming down while we were there. I’ll let the pictures do the talking! After trying to climb a little side peak (and getting about halfway up) and relaxing on the rocks a bit, we headed back down. Same kind of routine–dinner and socializing before bed!

Now day three is a special one. 1-it’s my birthday! 2-it’s when you are “supposed” to go over the pass. 3-you go to Sutherland Falls–NZ’s highest waterfall. After waking up, and getting a few birthday wishes from Otto, Robin, Christian, and Lisa, we were going to head off. The keas (one of my new favourite animals), the world’s only mountain parrot, were out in full force picking our scraps off the picnic tables and hanging in the trees! They caused a brief delay, but eventually we started and going up the pass was much worse with a pack on, but the sun was shining again and the views made it all worth it, even for the second time. At the top of the pass, I had my first birthday task–a friend had given me a beer and told me to chug it at the most scenic place I go on my birthday, so it got skulled on top of McKinnon Pass. That was, however, the only beer I drank on my entire 21st! We continued on a wee bit further and got to a little shelter at the junction to Sutherland Falls. First of all, they had tea and coffee in the shelter, so that was satisfying, but the falls, NZ’s highest at 580m were stunning! And, since by this point we had worked up a sweat, we were able to walk behind the falls, which was really thrilling. The water, of course was chilly, and is splashing and blowing, so you can’t really see as you walk on slippery rocks, but there are mini-rainbows everywhere from the splashing of the water off the rocks and the sun hitting it! By the time we got back to the shelter, the 3 Aussie couples had gotten word that it was my birthday, so I got my first wee serenade there (and reminded how young I really was still)! After singing, they reminded me how young I was (the youngest on the track in our group), and how as you grow, life changes, but there are always new adventures to keep it interesting! They continued to joke with me the rest of the day about my knees hurting and back hurting and so on, but once again, we finally made it to the hut. This one was covered in more sand flies than the others, so we stayed inside and cooked and socialized some more. Now, I did run back to my bunk to grab something from my bag and had a surprise when I got back! Lisa had carried a brownie and candle with her and, while I was gone, lit it and told everyone to sing, so once I got back I had 40 people singing to me with a brownie and candle!! I’m not sure how she carried a brownie 2 days without eating–certainly a feat I’d be incapable of–but it was much appreciated! And that’s how my 21st birthday was spent.

Friendly Kea

Friendly Kea

The fourth and final day is a long, but easy walk back through the bush to be picked up by the boat. Pretty uneventful on this day. Just had to say goodbye to our new friends and Lisa and I went back to Des’s house for the night before catching our buses and going separate ways, so now I’m back here in Dunedin to pack up before heading on my last adventure.

Milford Track was the very first thing I had booked in New Zealand and it was everything I had hoped for and more. I was skeptical of the “crowded-ness” of it, but grew to love the socializing aspect. As I mentioned, the weather here tends to be pretty awful–28 days/month of rain with rain coming as fast as 6 inches/hr at times. We, however, had 4 straight sunny days with temperatures reaching 28 degrees (that’s upper 80s, Americans)! What an incredible trip to wind down my time in this amazing place and I can only hope my final roadtrip will be just as good!

Thank you all for the birthday wishes! I don’t know when my next blog will be–depends on internet access, but I will definitely post one, hopefully two, before coming back to the stars and stripes. See yall soon!!

Going Coast to Coast

Brian Merewitz is a senior Natural Resources Management major and is currently studying abroad in New Zealand.

[Originally posted September 29, 2013]

No, this has nothing to do with the Sam Adams song for the few of you who even know who that singer is. Instead, it has to do with my weekend starting in Dunedin on the Pacific Ocean (east coast) and going to Fiordland and the Tasman Sea (west coast). This one may be long, so let’s get started (but at least read the P.S. at the bottom). And I haven’t gotten picture formatting perfect, yet, so sorry! Working on it still!

We began on Friday morning at the ripe hour of 6am–the sunrise in Dunedin was beautiful! Unfortunately, the forecast for our trip was not. Like last weekend, this one was calling for steady rain Friday and heavy rain Saturday. Our plan was to hike up to the Luxmore Hut along the Kepler Track (one of NZ’s Great Walks) in Fiordland National Park on Friday night. Sounds eerily similar to last weekend, right? Well, luckily we had daylight this time–sorry, I was willing to sacrifice going to class in exchange for hiking in the daylight. And, there’s no such thing as bad weather, just improper clothing. This time, equipped with a waterproof pack cover and rain pants (I had neither last weekend), we hit the trail head around 10am. For this trip, there were 5 of us–myself, Jeanne, Craig and Abbie representing America and Graham being the lone Canadien. Oh, I forgot to mention our other companions, the hundreds of sandflies (NZ’s version of a mosquito) at the trailhead, but luckily, they stayed behind in the car park. I guess they are a sign of summer approaching, though!

Brian Merewitz 9

Anyway, enough rambling. The trail to Luxmore Hut begins in the bush, but climbs up above tree line with a 2,250ft elevation gain over 8.5 miles, which the sign said is expected to take 6 hours. So, off we went. There were drizzles along the car ride and it was cloudy at the trailhead, but no rain for now. Shortly after entering the bush, that changed. Just as expected, a steady rain came down, but luckily, the trees helped protect us. It’s a great thing NZ has this hut system because a forecast like this would’ve most likely forced us to cancel a tent-camping trip. Regardless, we continued, had a wet lunch break and broke tree line around 2pm! As we were exiting the bush, the clouds opened and the rain cleared for the final 30 minutes of our walk! Hint: you’ll notice a trend. However, we made it to the hut in just under 4 and a half hours, so we were feeling great! Well, actually we ached. We ached a lot for a group of five 20+ year olds, of which 4 (all but me) are or were NCAA D1 athletes. Craig and Jeanne ski at Colby College in Maine, Graham skis at St. Lawrence in NY and Abbie did play field hockey prior to back surgery for St. Lawrence.

From the hut across Lake Te Anau

From the hut across Lake Te Anau

Anyway, after a short snack and stretch, we went to explore the Luxmore Caves. By this point, the rain had begun again, but the caves were only 10 minutes away and, obviously, covered. So, we went in and it was really neat! You are free to go as far as you want and explore as much as you want, but there are signs warning you that it can get dark and don’t touch stalactites or stalagmites. When we were done and got back to the cave opening, we were welcomed by a beam of light coming through–the sun returned! Hint: start catching the trend. With the clouds broken, we took the opportunity to catch a few photos of the area around the hut. It was stunning! The mountains surrounding the hut were so jagged with Lake Te Anau just below. Anyway, we went back to the hut, relaxed, met the others staying there (1 girl from Dunedin and 2 English couples), lit the wood stove, hung our wet stuff to dry and made dinner. For the rest of the evening, the clouds would come in and block all views, then clear for just a few minutes, so we could snap pictures. After dinner, we lit the wood stove and all decided to sleep in the common room in front of the fire, rather than in the cold bunk room, so we dragged our mattresses (foam pads) out and played some cards then were in bed by 9pm. Yes, 5 college kids, in bed by 9pm on Friday night. And boy did we sleep–at 8am, 11 hours later, the sun was shining in our faces as we finally awoke from a deep sleep.

Home!

Home!

Light through Luxmore cave

Light through Luxmore cave

After an oatmeal breakfast and a long stretching session, we were off to conquer Luxmore Peak. We weren’t going to do the entire Kepler Track, due to deep snow and not having enough time, but we did want to wander up to the peak, which is the highest part of the track. Some friends went last weekend and said the conditions were good enough to make it up. So, with the sun out, we wandered up. Leaving our heavy backpacks at the hut felt great! We made it up to the summit in just over 1 hour, with much more of the same cloudy-then-clearing weather. In no rush, we sat at the top for a few minutes, then wandered back down and as soon as we left, of course, the clouds came in heavy and eliminated all views. If you haven’t caught on to the hints yet, we hit the weather clearings perfectly for everything on this trip! We ate lunch, stretched again, and talked to two new folks who showed up. Both ladies, in their 40s or 50s, were breathing heavily and in running clothes, but there’s no way that they could’ve possibly just run up the trail that five athletic college kids just struggled with, right? We got up in 4.5 hours, when the sign said it took six. Well, they did, and it got even worse. They kept coming. There ended up being 7 or 8 people, between 30 and 50, who had just run up the 8.5 mile trail in 2.5 hours. Boy, did we feel dumb. One proceeded to tell us that she once ran the entire 36 mile trail in just over 10 hours! So, we stretched our aching, decrepit bodies in awe and began to walk back to the car park, which took only 3.5 hours, but of course the group of runners passed us again going down. We got back to the car just around 4pm and were going to drive towards Milford Sound (2hrs away) to camp because we had to be at the sound at 9:30am for a cruise. This time, we were in a tent.

On the way to the summit!

On the way to the summit!

Since luck was with us, we got to the campsite during a break in the rain and set up the tent alongside a river with occasional glimpses through the clouds at the surrounding peaks. Once the tent was set up, the rain returned, so we sat in the car and ate dinner with the sandflies who were waiting for us at this campsite too. Anyway, it worked out fine, and we were in bed now at 9pm. Unfortunately we didn’t sleep as well, and had to get up at 7:30am. We finished the drive into Milford Sound, which is an amazing drive. The sound was even better. I’m not sure I can describe it in words, so I’ve attached several photos and a video. All I can say is it was definitely worthy of a World Heritage Site status. Imagine sheer mountain cliffs raising 2,000m out of the water (and they told us they continued down to depths of 200m below the water) covered with waterfalls, as this is one of the planet’s rainiest regions. By the time we actually got to the sound, many of the clouds have lifted and we had a beautiful day in Milford Sound standards. We saw seals and dolphins, who loved to swim in front of the boat and put on a show! They are so playful!! Oh, and the sandflies were here too, but one sign told us that the Maori (native New Zealanders) believed god put sandflies here to make sure that humans wouldn’t stay too long and mess up the area. Anyway, Milford Sound with Mitre Peak is often the iconic image of New Zealand and it lived up to its name! Milford Sound leads out into the Tasman Sea and is actually a fiord, not sound, because it is glacial, but the original settlers didn’t know that. Our cruise took us to the Tasman Sea, then we drove across country back to Dunedin (it only takes 5 hours in this country) in time to make fajitas for dinner! Milford Sound may be the most beautiful place I’d ever seen and this was one of, if not the, best weekends I’ve had here! Couldn’t be happier.

Mitre Peak (centre) and Milford Sound

Mitre Peak (centre) and Milford Sound

Hard to believe I’ve been here over 3 months and only have 2 months left. We only have 2 weeks of class left and I’ve never been so upset to be done with school… Last random thought: I actually liked coffee for the first time, which I’m not sure is good or bad, but maybe it was just because it was free and I loaded it with sweetener…

A happenstance meeting with a sea lion

Brian Merewitz is a senior Natural Resources Management major and is currently studying abroad in New Zealand.

[Originally posted September 18, 2013]

So here’s a rare mid-week blog post! I started playing touch rugby last week and we got our first win this week, but let’s back up to 9am. Yes, on my day off, I got up at 9am. If that’s not exciting enough, my friend Will and I went scuba diving at Aramoana Mole, about 30 minutes from town where the harbour meets the ocean. I did bring my camera, but forgot my sandwich that I made and left on the counter.

All suited up and going down!

All suited up and going down!



Will is a dive master (the highest certification besides instructor), so I felt comfortable going out alone with him. We went and picked up our gear and headed out and were all dressed and ready to go in the water by 10:30am. It was pretty sunny out, so it was all good. There are 3 wrecks, two of which are dive-able, out there. The water was a brisk 11 (50) degrees, but we were all suited up in a two piece wet suit with boots and a hood! So, I’ll summarize the first 2 dives together. The first two were both on the same wreck, but different areas. I was a little unsure what it would be like after diving the Great Barrier Reef, but it was incredible! Not nearly as many fish (and really no colorful ones), but there is so much stuff growing on the rocks and ship parts. It was covered in nudibranchs, nudibranch eggs, some blue things that I’m not sure what they were, we saw a Conger eel, heaps of starfish of all different sizes and colours, kelp and corals. It was amazing! One part in particular was like a cage, almost, of boat pieces. They were large enough to swim through but it was just poles covered in plants and things all around you! Kind of claustrophobic, but not as bad as kelp forests!

Now, dive three. The infamous one. We were really enjoying the day and it was really nice out, so we went in to the new (and closer) wreck and planned to swim back. I had the camera, so we dropped down, all good. We were swimming around, just as planned, and I was happily taking pictures of the side of the boat. Then it happened. I saw it coming right at me, at full speed, jaws wide open! This sounds unreal, but trust me, it was real. Surreal, but real! No, it was not a shark, though, but enough to scare me. Instead, as I turned my head, maybe 10ft to my left was a full grown sea lion coming straight at me, maybe 20ft underwater. In case you weren’t sure, it was bigger and a faster swimmer than me. And yes, its mouth really was wide open. So, just like you’re taught to do, I panicked! The sea lion quickly shot straight up to the surface then back down, circled me twice, and left. Will is from California and has over 200 dives, so he is kind of familiar to these ferocious creatures, but not me. I yelled, or at least, the best yell you can do with a regulator in your mouth and went straight to the surface and on the rocks. Not sure what that was going to do because sea lions can climb on rocks way faster than me, especially with fins, but I did it. However, he was gone, or so I thought. Will couldn’t find me under water, so he came to the surface, all excited and yelled, “Did you see that sea lion?!” Of course I told him my dramatic story and he had a similar one and then I saw it swim right along the rocks just in front of me, then stop, pick its head out of the water, give me a 5 second stare down, then it was gone. This time for good. It was incredible. Unfortunately, I didn’t think to take a picture.

After talking to Will, some people on shore, and the folks at the dive shop all said that it’s common for them to come up and play with you. Also, they are very curious, so they will sometimes even put their teeth on you to see what you are, but not actually bite. Guess I know for next time to stay calm and video it–just like you’re taught. Anyway, we went back down and finished our dive and had an incredible time. We also saw Paua, which is an edible, big shellfish, but we it’s illegal to take them with scuba gear on and you need a knife. Moral of the day–I, in fact, CAN survive from 9am-5pm without eating (although I desperately missed my sandwich)!

One of the sea stars

One of the sea stars

Aotearoa!

Lake Wakatipu from the Queenstown Gardens

Lake Wakatipu from the Queenstown Gardens

Brian Merewitz is a senior Natural Resources Management major and is currently studying abroad in New Zealand.

[Originally posted August 18, 2013]

Aotearoa (goodluck pronouncing it) is the Maori name for New Zealand translating to “The Land of the Long White Cloud.” How does that relate to this blog? It doesn’t, but I thought a foreign language would get your attention. Well, I guess there were long white clouds in the blue skies, but they were great (except for picture taking).

Anyway, first of all, I jumped! 134m (440ft) off a perfectly good ledge for no reason other than because I wanted to (and paid tons of money to)! It was incredible! Such a rush as you free-fall for 8 seconds head first to the ground! It really was so much fun and totally worth it, plus I got a free t-shirt for doing it! Oh, and it’s the highest bungy jump in Australasia and owned by the guy who invented bungy jumping.

We also stopped at a few wineries on the way, as we were in the heart of Pinot Noir country with heaps of vineyards everywhere–plus they have free tastings of actually good wines!

However, Queenstown is an awesome little town! Very touristy, but sits on a beautiful lake, with tons of shops, food, a garden, ski resorts, bars, and is the “Adventure Capital of the South.” Oh, it’s expensive too… But, they have a place called Fergburger, known for massive, delicious burgers. I’m sure you’ll all be shocked to know I devoured it with no problems.

Then, Saturday night (after bungy and Fergburger), we drove the “Gateway to Paradise” to the start of the Routeburn Track. What an amazing drive along the shore of Lake Wakatipu (pronounced just how it’s spelled)! Bright blue water with huge peaks behind it! We hit a traffic jam though – sheep were being herded across the road…

Then, we went to go hike the Routeburn Track–one of Lonely Planet’s top hikes in the world! I see why. First of all, you hike along the river with the clearest, turquoise water imaginable. We stayed at a hut next to some falls and the night skies are incredible here but I can’t get them in a picture, so you have to believe me! We got up at 5:45am and walked up to the Harris Saddle at 1277m to watch the sunrise. There is also a lake up there and it may have been the most beautiful place I’d ever been!

The colors are so vivid here! The water is so blue, the grass/forests are so green, the mountains are so picturesque and gray with some snow! This experience has been so incredible so far! I know every blog says “this was the coolest place ever” but I think this one may have actually been, but around every corner here there’s new mountains, rivers, lakes, etc that are all so amazing! The land down under the “Down Under” has been absolutely amazing, but I can’t wait to see what Australia’s get in store next week!!

Lake Harris on the saddle  just after sunrise!

Lake Harris on the saddle just after sunrise!

Toryn says Kia Ora to New Zealand

I am now in New Zealand! The 12-hour flight went faster than I had expected! I watched Pitch Perfect and What to Expect When You’re Expecting. Pitch Perfect never gets old. Then I fell asleep and when I woke up we had less than 2 hours remaining. Then, we experienced the scariest turbulence in my history of flying. :/ Other notes about the flight: airline food is good (at least on Air New Zealand) and I had my first “legal” glass of wine. :] 

The lady that drove me to the campus pointed out the town to me and kept saying “bits and pieces.” I’m not sure if that is a Kiwi thing or if that was just her. She would say oh that place you can buy such and such and bits and pieces. When she got a phone call, she said I’m pretty busy doing bits and pieces. 

I have moved into my flat now. It is cute. :] When the wind blows, the whole place creaks. And none of my flatmates are here yet so the noises keep freaking me out a little! The campus is pretty desolate. I guess I got here a little too early… I thought I would be jetlagged pretty bad and just want to sleep, but it’s quite the opposite feeling. I want to get out and PARTAY. Lol

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Flat at Lincoln University

So today I walked around. The campus is cute and small. The library is this old building with a clock tower. It’s pretty awesome looking. I walked to the town and went to the grocery store. It’s called New World. The prices are high, because New Zealand has a pretty high cost of living. I haven’t bought any alcohol yet, but the thought that I can is weird… It feels like cheating. I did buy some kiwis, however. I felt it was appropriate.

I walked into the little town of Lincoln right when all the kids were getting out of school. A bunch of them were wearing like these yellow crossing guard vests. It was strange. I walked down by a creek and watched some ducks. I haven’t checked my bird guide to see what kind they were. There was one white one, like the Aflac duck. I think they might have been released domestics. The creek had a lot of litter in it. I was shocked. New Zealand is known for their environmentalism. I guess not every Kiwi is perfect. :]

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ReStart Shopping Area in Christchurch

Things don’t seem that foreign here, but I definitely feel foreign. The cars drive on the left side of the road… I got a ride to my flat from the pest control guy… I know weird, but the shuttle lady had to ditch me and he offered. I set all my stuff in the front seat without realizing that it was actually the driver’s seat… Thankfully I realized it before I started to get in. The money here is cool. It all has pictures of birds on it. Money works the same here, of course, but I got this weird feeling handing it over to pay. Like I could somehow mess it up or that the way I pay would give away that I’m an American. Silly I know. Also, all the temperatures are in Celsius and I feel like there is not easy way to understand that.  

There are lots of mountains. :] New Zealand kind of is a mash up of all the places I’ve ever been too. A lot of the trees and plants are the same as back home, but then they are mixed with like palm trees and tropical looking things. There are lots of flowers and birds. I keep reminding myself that I won’t be seeing any squirrels on campus. 

I did meet up with a girl from school tonight, Rita. Tomorrow we are going to take the bus into Christchurch and hopefully take another bus to a beach! 

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Sumner Beach

Toryn is a senior studying fish, wildlife, and conservation biology at CSU.  She is attending Lincoln University in Christchurch, New Zealand for the spring 2013 term.